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  • Report:  #1585

Complaint Review: Ryan Homes - Gaithersburg Maryland

Reported By:
- Rockville, MD,
Submitted:
Thu, March 16, 2000
Updated:
Fri, November 02, 2007

Ryan Homes
555 Quince Orchard Rd Gaithersburg, Maryland, U.S.A.
Web:
N/A
Categories:
Builders & Contractors

My fiance and I signed a contract with Ryan for a house to be built in June. We weren't able to get market rate financing, all we could get was one point above market. According to the contract, we were to exercise good faith to get financing at market rates or better. We therefore requested our downpayment back from Ryan ($12,800). Ryan refuses to return it. The mortgage company, NVR, which is owned by Ryan told the sales agent that my credit is bad, and that was the reason we couldn't get financing. The agent says that we therefore committed fraud when we signed the mortgage application sheet when we signed the contract--(not the application with the mortgage company).

The thing is, the agent filled out that form--not us. She told us at the time that the information was preliminary and was just to give us an idea of how much our payments would be. I did not know what my credit would be like because I'd never had a report done. So she wrote that I had a clean credit record. She left out some things we told her, but she kept telling us not to worry, that everything would be worked out with the mortgage company.

Ryan now says that if I had revealed my credit record at the time we were going to sign the contract, they would not have entered into it. RIGHT!

(BY the way, my credit record is not that bad).

Ryan now says that we have to either take the expensive loan or they'll keep our deposit!

I bet that we're not the first people who are being forced into accepting an expensive loan.

BE CAREFUL WITH RYAN HOMES!!!



21 Updates & Rebuttals

Ronald

Glen Allen,
Virginia,
U.S.A.
Seen this before, common NVR/Ryan homes scam

#2Consumer Comment

Fri, November 02, 2007

I am a severely harmed victim of this company, as seen in a separate report. But I want to comment on the ratio justification for tolerating the building of crap homes, and the tolerance for lying sales people Ryan uses being negated by their contracts. Also, some *** compared buying a home to a Mcdonalds hamburger, where you might lose a dollar or two. Mcdonalds will gladly give you another if it's made wrong. That's not so much the case with your six figure Ryan Homes if it is seriously defective; as if there was a comparison there. Boeing builds a lot of commercial aircraft, many with decades of service. 10% to 20% of them don't crash from defects. American made doesn't have to mean crap made, but it's just too easily accepted in some things, like new homes. Ryan does not always honor contracts. Those contracts signed are primarily for use against their buyers when things go bad anyway. The contracts don't make Ryan Homes accountable for anything enforceable. I just talked to another victim that made a down payment which they needed back, and they had a good faith agreement in their contract. Before their home was finished her husband was laid off work unexpectedly, and they knew there was no way they could still afford the new house being built. They no longer qualified for the original loan terms they were quoted. By contract they were supposedly allowed to back out of the deal. Instead, NVR Mortgage offered them an impossibly high loan rate and payment to technically fill the contract terms, knowing full well the buyer could never pay for the house, just so they could still pocket the down payment. NVR would have given them the loan too, and immediately sold it to another bank, and sent them both down the road to foreclosure with no qualms. That's the true face of this company. People seeking out a complaint site for no good reason to tell how wonderful there Ryan Home is, I don't buy in to that, though I'm sure there are some people happy with their home. According to Ryan Homes 100% of their customers are happy. That doesn't help those of us ripped off by them. Make no mistake, NVR/ Ryan Homes are rip-off artists. The fact some didn't experience that side of them doesn't negate that. It also moronic to think that every American is going to be able to totally monitor their builder with expertise, and pay high lawyer fees to verify every word written or spoken, to know they're getting what the builder promises. What happened to America, where not only can you not trust anyone to keep their word, but we even accept the lying and fraud as good business, if they can get away with it in the fine print.


Joseph

Indian Trail,
North Carolina,
U.S.A.
Ryan Built my Home in Indian Trail

#3Consumer Comment

Thu, October 11, 2007

I have nothing but good things to say about this company and it's dedication to customer service. My Townhome was completed in May of 2005 and when i did the walk through I saw a few insignificant things I wanted given attention. I believe few people would have even noticed what i did since I am super critical when it comes to buying anything new. I expect perfection in all areas. In any case they came back within 2 days and fixed everything to my com[lete satisfaction. I had a home custom built in MA and the qualoty of that home was far, far less then my new one in NC. I was called virtually every month for the 1st 6 months by a Ryan rep. who asked if all was well and if anything could be done by them. I would not for a momment hesitate to by another Ryan Home and I am frankly puzzled by the complaints of these people although I don't doubt what they say. Given the sheer number of homes built by this company I believe their ratio of complaints to homes completed is quite low.


Ginger

Phoenix,
Arizona,
U.S.A.
Being there ..I see buidlers around us covering up major problems and no one is enforcing the codes

#4Consumer Suggestion

Sun, May 25, 2003

It is not possible to be at the construction site all day, every day, and some really serious defects can be covered up in a matter of hours or even minutes. People have to go to work. Even if you hire experts to make inspections during construction, they are not there all day every day. I see buidlers around us covering up major problems and no one is enforcing the codes, even. What would really help consumers is a statewide database of all builder complaints that is maintained by a group of consumer organizations, not by the gov't. Let consumers make informed choices, and stop hiding complaints. Some states Attorney General's offices make complaints public, and this is good, but some states keep them secret. Most BBB's keep them private and only use a rating system that can be years before anything is divulged. About half the states have no regulatory agency--thus no database of complaints--on home builders. People are doing what their realtors suggest, like checking the BBB, and coming up empty handed. they need a REAL consumer database, that is not biased or censored or secret. If builders don't want to have a bad showing there, they will have to do the job right. What a concept.


Ginger

Phoenix,
Arizona,
U.S.A.
Being there ..I see buidlers around us covering up major problems and no one is enforcing the codes

#5Consumer Suggestion

Sun, May 25, 2003

It is not possible to be at the construction site all day, every day, and some really serious defects can be covered up in a matter of hours or even minutes. People have to go to work. Even if you hire experts to make inspections during construction, they are not there all day every day. I see buidlers around us covering up major problems and no one is enforcing the codes, even. What would really help consumers is a statewide database of all builder complaints that is maintained by a group of consumer organizations, not by the gov't. Let consumers make informed choices, and stop hiding complaints. Some states Attorney General's offices make complaints public, and this is good, but some states keep them secret. Most BBB's keep them private and only use a rating system that can be years before anything is divulged. About half the states have no regulatory agency--thus no database of complaints--on home builders. People are doing what their realtors suggest, like checking the BBB, and coming up empty handed. they need a REAL consumer database, that is not biased or censored or secret. If builders don't want to have a bad showing there, they will have to do the job right. What a concept.


Ginger

Phoenix,
Arizona,
U.S.A.
Being there ..I see buidlers around us covering up major problems and no one is enforcing the codes

#6Consumer Suggestion

Sun, May 25, 2003

It is not possible to be at the construction site all day, every day, and some really serious defects can be covered up in a matter of hours or even minutes. People have to go to work. Even if you hire experts to make inspections during construction, they are not there all day every day. I see buidlers around us covering up major problems and no one is enforcing the codes, even. What would really help consumers is a statewide database of all builder complaints that is maintained by a group of consumer organizations, not by the gov't. Let consumers make informed choices, and stop hiding complaints. Some states Attorney General's offices make complaints public, and this is good, but some states keep them secret. Most BBB's keep them private and only use a rating system that can be years before anything is divulged. About half the states have no regulatory agency--thus no database of complaints--on home builders. People are doing what their realtors suggest, like checking the BBB, and coming up empty handed. they need a REAL consumer database, that is not biased or censored or secret. If builders don't want to have a bad showing there, they will have to do the job right. What a concept.


Ginger

Phoenix,
Arizona,
U.S.A.
Being there ..I see buidlers around us covering up major problems and no one is enforcing the codes

#7Consumer Suggestion

Sun, May 25, 2003

It is not possible to be at the construction site all day, every day, and some really serious defects can be covered up in a matter of hours or even minutes. People have to go to work. Even if you hire experts to make inspections during construction, they are not there all day every day. I see buidlers around us covering up major problems and no one is enforcing the codes, even. What would really help consumers is a statewide database of all builder complaints that is maintained by a group of consumer organizations, not by the gov't. Let consumers make informed choices, and stop hiding complaints. Some states Attorney General's offices make complaints public, and this is good, but some states keep them secret. Most BBB's keep them private and only use a rating system that can be years before anything is divulged. About half the states have no regulatory agency--thus no database of complaints--on home builders. People are doing what their realtors suggest, like checking the BBB, and coming up empty handed. they need a REAL consumer database, that is not biased or censored or secret. If builders don't want to have a bad showing there, they will have to do the job right. What a concept.


John

Baltimore,
Maryland,
U.S.A.
I agree with you in the Ryan is not a perfect homebuilder, and does not do the bst job in choosing subcontractors.

#8Consumer Comment

Mon, May 19, 2003

George, I agree with you in the Ryan is not a perfect homebuilder, and does not do the bst job in choosing subcontractors. There were things that we saw done that we did not like, so we contacted the construction supervisor, and told him what we wanted while the house was going up, and shortly thereafter. And I know full well that people have had significantly less pleasureable experiences with Ryan. I made no claim that Ryan was sent by the gods to be our answer to homebuilding. The entire point of my original post was to tell people that they need to be vigilant when their home is being built. People were posting "My windows were installed upside down," or "My door was installed backwards." My response to claims like that is "Where were you when the house was being built?" If I could have watched my car being built, I would have. Yet people are spending many times more than that, and it amazes me that people could walk through and move into a house that has some of the glaring deficencies that I have seen listed on this (and other) Web sites. And I realize things go wrong that you wouldn't see in a walkthrough. I'm not claiming that you can catch everything while it's being built. My assertion was aimed towards people who did not take the time to be part of the process and be a part of their home building. I don't mean pick up a hammer and help, but stop by the site a few (at least once) times a week and see how things are going. As well, maybe "suckered" was a bad word to use, but the salesman told us that since we were not going to be living here 30 years (our first home - a townhome), and since the upgrades were so expensive, that upgraded carpeting would not necessarily be the way to go. We met with a company (sub-contractor) who offered us a large assortment of carpeting (base model - the free stuff -, along with various upgraded versions). If this were our "final" home, we might have spent the couple grand (yikes!) to get the more "lush" carpeting, but our salesman recommended that we would not need it. I regret using "suckered." But believe me, I am a cynic, too, when it comes to salesman. In fact, another reason I posted was because our salesman was so honest and up front with us. The postings turned sour when everyone immediately assumed that someone not bashing Ryan must be a "shill" from the company. Oh well, it's all for naught in the end, I guess... Ryan is no better or worse than any other homebuilder (As if Ryland or Toll Brothers builds 100% perfect homes). No matter what, people are going to complain and things are going to go wrong. I don't know what kind of home you purchased, George, but whatever it is/was, I hope you kept a good eye on what they were doing. That's all I was suggesting for people to do.


George

Philadelphia,
Pennsylvania,
U.S.A.
GETTING REAL

#9Consumer Suggestion

Mon, May 19, 2003

JOhn Seriously Think about what you have told us here Your honest and helpful Ryan sales person has helped you "avoid being suckered into buying upgraded carpeting". My question is who was going to sucker you and who did your sales person help you aviod? Ryan homes sub contractes all of its work. The people whom work for this comapny do not swing a hammer or make an electrical connection. The problem lies in there process of subcontractor selection. Ryan homes does not choose there subcontracter based on quality or workmanship but rather on the lowest bidder. I am unsure if my comments are eloguent or mature but I do know they are truthful. You see john Ryans process lends itself to poor labor and construction. I own a ryan home and enjoy my home with no major problems at all. I did however notice that during the process there where major areas of concern that ryan could work on to correct some of the problems they allowed to happen and would have gone unnoticed if not for extremely agressive "watch Dog" technigues of the future homeowners. Ryan needs to be honest with the potential homeowners from the start of the process and they need to open communicatio lines with in there organization more. I have a little information that may be of interst to all future Ryan home owners. There production managers recieve a bonus based on lenght of construction time for a home. This has in my opinion caused for rushed a sub standart work. And finally yes Not everyones exsperiences are the same, some are good some are bad, not all are either and certianly as john is his mature wisdom should realize is certianly not all are the way his have been. P.S. Ryan homes claims a profit margin on average of 4-6% on there annual report for 2002. They also advertise a 10% home discount for there employess.


John

Baltimore,
Maryland,
U.S.A.
Come on down, George

#10Consumer Suggestion

Fri, May 16, 2003

George, The Webmaster now has my e-mail address and phone number... I welcome you to come on down from Philly to see my home. Since we have moved in, we have found a few trivialities... A few sinkholes, the normal drywall cracks and nail pops, but (knock on wood) as of yet no major problems. And each has been quickly and effectively repaired by Ryan. I thank you, George, for your sincere, eloquent, and mature response. I feel sorry for all the people who have had problems... Neighbors of mine have had their problems, some more serious than mine, but most dealt more with the land around the homes (some flooding due to bad grading) than with the homes themselves. And in each case, Ryan, came in (twice in one home) and replaced the carpeting and padding. Maybe most of them are villains... But not all of them are. Oh well... Shame on me for trying to give some advice to people from my own experience... I forgot that no one in the world can be trusted, and no one does quality work anymore.


George

Philadelphia,
Pennsylvania,
U.S.A.
money where your email is

#11Consumer Comment

Tue, January 21, 2003

OK John I am ready to buy a home have been considering a Ryan home and would like to take you up on your offer. Please notify me a good time for use to meet for the JOhn from Baltimore home tour? I am serious and think John should let us all come down and take a look. After all it would prove his point. Althoug I am sure John is a well intention person I will note hold my breath for his invite..


Cindy

Edmond,
Oklahoma,
Three Kinds of UN-Believers

#12Consumer Suggestion

Tue, August 13, 2002

There seems to be three kinds of people that don't believe a new homeowner's complaint: Builders, builder's paid shills, and people that are so scared of how they'd deal with it that they pretend it can't happen to them... kinda like the Hostage Syndrome, where the captives identify with their captor rather than accept the truth, let alone do something about it. This last one is made up of people that've never been thru this, yet they're out there telling people how to deal with it, mainly with totally worthless comments like "get a lawyer," or "get over it," etc. Happy home owners are not here complaining. And good builders don't have to send their shills here to post their crapola rebuttals.


John

Baltimore,
Maryland,
Your snide comments above

#13Consumer Comment

Mon, July 29, 2002

Feel free to stop by my home, if you do not think my comments are real. I am offended that you felt the need to add that snide little comment after my piece. Maybe that is why you printed it, so you could add that little disclaimer? The whole point of my letter was that it seems as if people just don't get involved when the home is being built. I read stories from people who said that their windows were installed upside down, or a door was put on backwards. How could you sign papers on a house with such obvious problems? One simple walk-through would bring such problems to the homeowners attention. We stayed involved from day one, and when we saw something we did not like or were not sure about, we asked our salesperson or construction supervisor, and he gave us an explanation or, if we were not satisfied with that, had it fixed. Maybe we are lucky in the fact we have a honest and diligent salesperson and a supervisor to match. Maybe other Ryan sites have poorly trained and irresponsible staff. So, my letter was a warning to people not to just sign the papers, then show up three months later at a walkthrough with no idea of what the house is goin to look like. Get involved the whole way, make your opinions known as much as possible, and try to bring someone with you to the walkthrough that knows a little something about houses. If my advice and story means I am not real, then I guess I can stop paying my taxes and credit card bills. Hope you can try to be more careful with your analysis and inconsiderate remarks in the future.


John

Baltimore,
Maryland,
Just bought a Ryan home

#14Consumer Comment

Mon, July 08, 2002

I just moved into a Ryan home this weekend. Sure, it could fall apart tomorrow, who knows. What I do know is that I stayed informed the entire way. My fiance and I went to the hosue every weekend. We constantly talked with our salesman (who happened to be very honest about the process. He even told us not to buy things and to avoid being suckered into buying upgraded carpeting). We also spoke frequently with our construction manager. We had our walk-through, and there were things that need to be fixed, but it was all minor stuff that did not require major surgery on the house. I guess I just wanted to say that things happen when you build 40,000 houses a year (or whatever Ryan does). Is every hamburger McDonald's pumps out perfect and tasty? Is every Ram truck that rolls of the line perfect? Of course not. But, if people take the time to stay involved in the process, and keep themselves informed, they can save themselves some headaches. This comment may not get printed, especially since it compliments Ryan on a job that has been (so far) well done. Who knows, I could be on this site a month from now crying from the head of Ryan's CEO on a platter. There are so many factors to a home being built. From the construction supervisor to the Mexican laborer, from the attorney going through your settlement papers to the intern making copies. Things happen, but keeping in touch with your builder, and keeping informed of what is going on in your house (we looked through it up and down every weekend during construction, and whatever we had a question about, we asked), you may save yourselves a lot of problems. Thanks.


CS

Any,
Oklahoma,
Contracts are not enforced on builders

#15Consumer Suggestion

Tue, May 07, 2002

One of the respondants here said something on the order of "thank God we live in a country where contracts are enforced." Unfortunately, getting a contract enforced when a BUILDER has violated it is very hard. In many states homebuyers have essentially no recourse because the laws are written to favor builders...you can't even recover legal fees if you win a suit in some areas, making suing for breach of contract a waste of money. Even forfieting your deposit is cheaper than taking on a defectively built new home, with all the experts fees, legal fees and repair costs associated with it. Don't count on the warranty bailing you out...most are an illusion. It is important to read all of a contract, and not sign any part you don't agree to or understand. Some things homebuyers need to do, to protect themselves: 1. Research a builder, other than thru the BBB, before getting anywhere close to buying. Court records are a good way. More details can be found in "Your New House" by Fields and Fields, and from www.hadd.com and www.hobb.org This is not something you do in a day. 2. Get a copy of the sales contract to read over at home before you consider signing. Any builder that expects you to sign without reading should be avoided. You need more than the ten minutes they give you at closing. Plan on paying a real estate attorney about $300 to go over the papers with you, especially if you're new to this. 3. You need to have a clause in the contract that says you can have an independent inspection ($300 approx. depending on area), and that you can back out and get a refund if the results are not to your liking. Also, the contract needs to say that the home must be finished, meet code, and be done right, and you satisfied, before you are obligated to close--if the contract does not say this you may be forced to close on a lemon, with little recourse. Do not expect city inspectors to make sure things are right..they usually don't. 4. A clause allowing money to be held in escrow until the home is done and done right. This way if the builder never comes back to finish or fix something, you have money to hire someone else to do it. Once the builder has all your money, you may never see him again, no matter what the warranty and contracts say. Enforcing a contract on a builder is usually very hard and very expensive. All this will probably eliminate most tract home builders immediately, as they do not currently have to bend their rules to get buyers. But if everyone did this, builders would not have any choice but to operate more fairly, and build it right the first time. The idea is to not close until things are right, and have a way out if things go wrong, including your financing falling apart before the home is closed on. The more you can do to protect yourself the better. And take your time; you can't sort the bad ones from the good ones without spending some time doing your homework first.


Danny

Aldie,
Virginia,
ALWAYS read your contract

#16Consumer Comment

Mon, May 06, 2002

I don't know how Ryan Homes might do things in other parts of the country, but in Northern Virginia their contracts include specific circumstances that would allow the return of the down payment. However, for friends of mine who put down such a payment and then were forced to back out of the house (which is now well over a year late in the building), it took the help of a former employee who knew the ropes for that particular office to get their down payment back--even with my friends meeting the terms of refunding outlined in the contract--and then it was only over the course of several months.


Danny

Aldie,
Virginia,
ALWAYS read your contract

#17Consumer Comment

Mon, May 06, 2002

I don't know how Ryan Homes might do things in other parts of the country, but in Northern Virginia their contracts include specific circumstances that would allow the return of the down payment. However, for friends of mine who put down such a payment and then were forced to back out of the house (which is now well over a year late in the building), it took the help of a former employee who knew the ropes for that particular office to get their down payment back--even with my friends meeting the terms of refunding outlined in the contract--and then it was only over the course of several months.


Danny

Aldie,
Virginia,
ALWAYS read your contract

#18Consumer Comment

Mon, May 06, 2002

I don't know how Ryan Homes might do things in other parts of the country, but in Northern Virginia their contracts include specific circumstances that would allow the return of the down payment. However, for friends of mine who put down such a payment and then were forced to back out of the house (which is now well over a year late in the building), it took the help of a former employee who knew the ropes for that particular office to get their down payment back--even with my friends meeting the terms of refunding outlined in the contract--and then it was only over the course of several months.


Danny

Aldie,
Virginia,
ALWAYS read your contract

#19Consumer Comment

Mon, May 06, 2002

I don't know how Ryan Homes might do things in other parts of the country, but in Northern Virginia their contracts include specific circumstances that would allow the return of the down payment. However, for friends of mine who put down such a payment and then were forced to back out of the house (which is now well over a year late in the building), it took the help of a former employee who knew the ropes for that particular office to get their down payment back--even with my friends meeting the terms of refunding outlined in the contract--and then it was only over the course of several months.


Elizabeth

Mooresville,
North Carolina,
The Real Estate Law should be on your side as a prospective homeowner

#20Consumer Suggestion

Fri, March 29, 2002

As a person who was married for 12 years to a Ryan Homes Production Supervisor in the Charlotte area, and have an aunt who retired from NVR several years ago, I have heard many horror stories from homeowner's about the craftmanship and the stability of Ryan Homes and NVR Mortgage. First and foremost as far as resending your offer to purchase based on what your martgage rate would be, the sales agent should have educated you about that to begin with. Unfortunately, new homes sales agents are not either told, or do not have the education needed in order to do their jobs properly. Hense, the "car salesman" mentality to "get the deal done, no matter what". As far as NVR is concerned, I would check with a qualified real estate attorney in your area to find out the laws pertaining to the collection and refund of earnest money deposits in your state. Your credit is not the issue at this point. The issue is, your sales agent was not accurate in his/her statement to you, the consumer, and therefore should be reprimanded for that action. I would try to find out if new home sales agents are required in your state to carry a valid real estate license or whether they work under the umbrella of Ryan Homes brokerage license.This is the area you should focus on now. As far as Chrissy's and Maria's comment in keeping your deposit, it is not standard practice to keep a security deposit based upon credit, it is based upon the good faith documentation that is signed in the sales office at the time. Ultimately it still falls back in the sales persons' lap of responsibility to "reasonably know the law". Ryan does not and will not build any home based on verbage; they base it on the secuirty deposit. Therefore, read the response again. No matter how you "feel" about a deal, you MUST abide by the law. I assure you that Dwight Sharr, CEO does not do business in the manner which you just described in your rebuttal.


You are right. Buying a house is the biggest purchase you will ever make

#210

Tue, January 22, 2002

They filed the following rebuttal to the above Rip-Off Report: Their email: [email protected] Their name: Chrissy Their relationship to the company: Consumer Suggestion Rebuttal: This is in response to the editor's comments: You are right. Buying a house is the biggest purchase you will ever make, and that's why it is EXTREMELY important that you read the paperwork BEFORE you sign and make the committment! Thank GOD our country holds people to their contracts! What would you do if you had a contract with someone to buy your house and then they backed out at the last minute?? I know that Ryan's houses suck, BUT when you sign a contract, you've made a promise. If you break the contract, then there is a penalty to pay. If I go sign a contract with Ryan and have them build me a hideously ugly house with gross carpets and disgustins tiles, and then back out of the contract, what are they going to do with the house?? They'd have to rebuild in order to sell it! The bottom line is that you have to THINK before you sign a contract! When you have remorse and back out, you have to accept the penalty!


Ryan should keep their deposit. *EDitor's Comments

#220

Mon, July 09, 2001

This email is a rebuttal to RipOff #1585.
It was sent by @[email protected] at [email protected]

Be Careful with Ryan Homes rip off builder (#1585)

They filed the following rebuttal to the above Rip-Off Report:

Their email: [email protected]
Their relationship to the company: Supporter

Rebuttal:
I work for NVR's settlement division and I have seen numerous times when people back out after their house has been built and Ryan Homes NEVER keeps their deposit. People put down a deposit as a sign of good faith and if they do not live up to their end of the bargain, Ryan should keep their deposit.

I have seen many times when Ryan Homes was more than justified in keeping a deposit and they never have. As for the sales rep
filing out the paperwork, it is the responsibility of the customer to read everything they are signing and if they don't then it is their own fault.

They signed the contract so they are agreeing with what is written. They are just teying to stiff Ryan and making excuses over their own incompetence.
:::::::::::::::::::::::::::

EDitor's comment to the above REBUTTAL:::::::
What kind of builder will not let someone back out? Buying a home is the biggest purchase for most Americans in their life. What does the builder have to loose? The builder is better off selling the home to someone who really wants the home. The builder would only have more to gain by satisfying the customer who might even come back someday. The customer who wanted to back out of the deal would let all their friends know, Ryan Homes let me out of the deal because this was not right for them. Instead, the customers, now victims, will let everyone know what Ryan homes did to them. Ryan Homes just doesn't get it. Do they? If they haven't at this stage of the game, they will...

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