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  • Report:  #2342

I am very upset that pharmacies can be such ripoffs. Back in Feb I went to get a prescription for my son. When the girl rang up the medicine, it was $106. She asked if I had any questions. I told her that price could not be right because of my insurance. Since it had been so long since he had a prescription filled, they still had me down as a self pay. She made the correction and on the receipt it showed the ins. paying $44.02 and my share was $29.34. That does not total $106.

I emailed cvs to ask how they could get away with charging self pays so much more and why they would do that? Kick them when they're down!!!! Of course I never got a repsonse. I am just furious. If you ask me, it's the poor people who don't have insurance that should get a break. It doesn't make sense to me. How can they get away with that?



12 Updates & Rebuttals

Pharmacy Tech

Centreville,
Virginia,
U.S.A.
Must read before you file a Pharmacy ripoff report

#2UPDATE Employee

Mon, February 25, 2008

I have been working for CVS since 2001 and been working in Pharmacy for about 4 years. I also been train as Asst. Manger as well. First, people needs to know that drug are very expensive. Our job at CVS Pharmacy is to help people who are sick, not to rip them off. I used to work at one of the most profitable store and it's margin in the pharmacy is in the top amount ALL pharmacy with 16%. For your information, it range from 0.01%-16%, most store fall into the 3-5%. Compare to 35%-95% to the retail margin, one can say Pharmacy don't have much money. Any Pharmacy are depend on the sale of font store over-the-counter items for profit. One would ask why CVS still run a pharmacy then? if there are no Pharmacy in the CVS, would you come to CVS just to buy overpriced candy, paper towel, coffee,...etc? simple put, NO pharmacy, NO CVS. CVS need both font store and Pharmacy to compete. Second, most people are paying their Co-pay, which is the Co-pay of the cost with the insurance paying the remaining money. In your case, on the label say $106 for self-pay. It is $10.99+cost of the drug+15% mark up (this is the most update info I have). On the label that you paying a Co-pay of 29.34, with the word "INS: 44.02" on top of the line where your co-pay amount is. Well, that means you pay 29.34 to the insurance company, NOT CVS. Also, insurance have to pay CVS $44.02 just to cover the real cost of the drug. Pharmacy charge insurance for a service charge for each of the claim that we file against them. What the drug cost, how much we charge you at the checkout (Drug that run against your insurance), what the line "INS: XX.XX", have nothing do with how much CVS get pay by your insurance. Most people get hit with a $30,$45 dollar co-pay and think CVS have something to do with it. YES, you ONLY have to pay 30 dollar because your insurance pay the rest of the cost of the drug already. Most drug with 30 days supply are cost around $150-$400, many are costing more. People just need to understand more about how the money handle before pointing finger. The money that we took from you does not go into CVS' pocket, it goes right to the insurance that you used. CVS only get money from insurances months later, after the clear all the claims are clear and they pay us for the claims. Third, insurances are the one that responsible for how much you pay. Pick a plan that work out for you, and read all the fine print. Don't pick a $100/month plan that require you to pay FULL costs for the first $5000 without reading it, and complain about CVS rip you off for charging you $100+ for each drug you take. READ ALL painted paper that insurance sent you before you pick a plan. F.Y.I. CVS don't even pay me enough for my job as a Tech. And I have no reason to defend CVS. I speak the truth when I see one.(Maybe less people will complain to me DAILY about their co-pay)


Pharmacy Tech

Centreville,
Virginia,
U.S.A.
Must read before you file a Pharmacy ripoff report

#3UPDATE Employee

Mon, February 25, 2008

I have been working for CVS since 2001 and been working in Pharmacy for about 4 years. I also been train as Asst. Manger as well. First, people needs to know that drug are very expensive. Our job at CVS Pharmacy is to help people who are sick, not to rip them off. I used to work at one of the most profitable store and it's margin in the pharmacy is in the top amount ALL pharmacy with 16%. For your information, it range from 0.01%-16%, most store fall into the 3-5%. Compare to 35%-95% to the retail margin, one can say Pharmacy don't have much money. Any Pharmacy are depend on the sale of font store over-the-counter items for profit. One would ask why CVS still run a pharmacy then? if there are no Pharmacy in the CVS, would you come to CVS just to buy overpriced candy, paper towel, coffee,...etc? simple put, NO pharmacy, NO CVS. CVS need both font store and Pharmacy to compete. Second, most people are paying their Co-pay, which is the Co-pay of the cost with the insurance paying the remaining money. In your case, on the label say $106 for self-pay. It is $10.99+cost of the drug+15% mark up (this is the most update info I have). On the label that you paying a Co-pay of 29.34, with the word "INS: 44.02" on top of the line where your co-pay amount is. Well, that means you pay 29.34 to the insurance company, NOT CVS. Also, insurance have to pay CVS $44.02 just to cover the real cost of the drug. Pharmacy charge insurance for a service charge for each of the claim that we file against them. What the drug cost, how much we charge you at the checkout (Drug that run against your insurance), what the line "INS: XX.XX", have nothing do with how much CVS get pay by your insurance. Most people get hit with a $30,$45 dollar co-pay and think CVS have something to do with it. YES, you ONLY have to pay 30 dollar because your insurance pay the rest of the cost of the drug already. Most drug with 30 days supply are cost around $150-$400, many are costing more. People just need to understand more about how the money handle before pointing finger. The money that we took from you does not go into CVS' pocket, it goes right to the insurance that you used. CVS only get money from insurances months later, after the clear all the claims are clear and they pay us for the claims. Third, insurances are the one that responsible for how much you pay. Pick a plan that work out for you, and read all the fine print. Don't pick a $100/month plan that require you to pay FULL costs for the first $5000 without reading it, and complain about CVS rip you off for charging you $100+ for each drug you take. READ ALL painted paper that insurance sent you before you pick a plan. F.Y.I. CVS don't even pay me enough for my job as a Tech. And I have no reason to defend CVS. I speak the truth when I see one.(Maybe less people will complain to me DAILY about their co-pay)


Pharmacy Tech

Centreville,
Virginia,
U.S.A.
Must read before you file a Pharmacy ripoff report

#4UPDATE Employee

Mon, February 25, 2008

I have been working for CVS since 2001 and been working in Pharmacy for about 4 years. I also been train as Asst. Manger as well. First, people needs to know that drug are very expensive. Our job at CVS Pharmacy is to help people who are sick, not to rip them off. I used to work at one of the most profitable store and it's margin in the pharmacy is in the top amount ALL pharmacy with 16%. For your information, it range from 0.01%-16%, most store fall into the 3-5%. Compare to 35%-95% to the retail margin, one can say Pharmacy don't have much money. Any Pharmacy are depend on the sale of font store over-the-counter items for profit. One would ask why CVS still run a pharmacy then? if there are no Pharmacy in the CVS, would you come to CVS just to buy overpriced candy, paper towel, coffee,...etc? simple put, NO pharmacy, NO CVS. CVS need both font store and Pharmacy to compete. Second, most people are paying their Co-pay, which is the Co-pay of the cost with the insurance paying the remaining money. In your case, on the label say $106 for self-pay. It is $10.99+cost of the drug+15% mark up (this is the most update info I have). On the label that you paying a Co-pay of 29.34, with the word "INS: 44.02" on top of the line where your co-pay amount is. Well, that means you pay 29.34 to the insurance company, NOT CVS. Also, insurance have to pay CVS $44.02 just to cover the real cost of the drug. Pharmacy charge insurance for a service charge for each of the claim that we file against them. What the drug cost, how much we charge you at the checkout (Drug that run against your insurance), what the line "INS: XX.XX", have nothing do with how much CVS get pay by your insurance. Most people get hit with a $30,$45 dollar co-pay and think CVS have something to do with it. YES, you ONLY have to pay 30 dollar because your insurance pay the rest of the cost of the drug already. Most drug with 30 days supply are cost around $150-$400, many are costing more. People just need to understand more about how the money handle before pointing finger. The money that we took from you does not go into CVS' pocket, it goes right to the insurance that you used. CVS only get money from insurances months later, after the clear all the claims are clear and they pay us for the claims. Third, insurances are the one that responsible for how much you pay. Pick a plan that work out for you, and read all the fine print. Don't pick a $100/month plan that require you to pay FULL costs for the first $5000 without reading it, and complain about CVS rip you off for charging you $100+ for each drug you take. READ ALL painted paper that insurance sent you before you pick a plan. F.Y.I. CVS don't even pay me enough for my job as a Tech. And I have no reason to defend CVS. I speak the truth when I see one.(Maybe less people will complain to me DAILY about their co-pay)


Pharmacy Tech

Centreville,
Virginia,
U.S.A.
Must read before you file a Pharmacy ripoff report

#5UPDATE Employee

Mon, February 25, 2008

I have been working for CVS since 2001 and been working in Pharmacy for about 4 years. I also been train as Asst. Manger as well. First, people needs to know that drug are very expensive. Our job at CVS Pharmacy is to help people who are sick, not to rip them off. I used to work at one of the most profitable store and it's margin in the pharmacy is in the top amount ALL pharmacy with 16%. For your information, it range from 0.01%-16%, most store fall into the 3-5%. Compare to 35%-95% to the retail margin, one can say Pharmacy don't have much money. Any Pharmacy are depend on the sale of font store over-the-counter items for profit. One would ask why CVS still run a pharmacy then? if there are no Pharmacy in the CVS, would you come to CVS just to buy overpriced candy, paper towel, coffee,...etc? simple put, NO pharmacy, NO CVS. CVS need both font store and Pharmacy to compete. Second, most people are paying their Co-pay, which is the Co-pay of the cost with the insurance paying the remaining money. In your case, on the label say $106 for self-pay. It is $10.99+cost of the drug+15% mark up (this is the most update info I have). On the label that you paying a Co-pay of 29.34, with the word "INS: 44.02" on top of the line where your co-pay amount is. Well, that means you pay 29.34 to the insurance company, NOT CVS. Also, insurance have to pay CVS $44.02 just to cover the real cost of the drug. Pharmacy charge insurance for a service charge for each of the claim that we file against them. What the drug cost, how much we charge you at the checkout (Drug that run against your insurance), what the line "INS: XX.XX", have nothing do with how much CVS get pay by your insurance. Most people get hit with a $30,$45 dollar co-pay and think CVS have something to do with it. YES, you ONLY have to pay 30 dollar because your insurance pay the rest of the cost of the drug already. Most drug with 30 days supply are cost around $150-$400, many are costing more. People just need to understand more about how the money handle before pointing finger. The money that we took from you does not go into CVS' pocket, it goes right to the insurance that you used. CVS only get money from insurances months later, after the clear all the claims are clear and they pay us for the claims. Third, insurances are the one that responsible for how much you pay. Pick a plan that work out for you, and read all the fine print. Don't pick a $100/month plan that require you to pay FULL costs for the first $5000 without reading it, and complain about CVS rip you off for charging you $100+ for each drug you take. READ ALL painted paper that insurance sent you before you pick a plan. F.Y.I. CVS don't even pay me enough for my job as a Tech. And I have no reason to defend CVS. I speak the truth when I see one.(Maybe less people will complain to me DAILY about their co-pay)


Jason

East Providence,
Rhode Island,
U.S.A.
Refunds

#6UPDATE Employee

Thu, January 24, 2008

CVS policy is to give a refund in your original tender (or cash for debit/check) unless your transaction is months old. If you do not have a reciept you will only get store credit unless its a CVS product, and you will be asked for your ID. If your store is doing something different, they are not in compliance with corporate policy.


Carl

Forget U,
South Carolina,
U.S.A.
your front end sales

#7Consumer Suggestion

Mon, November 05, 2007

I personally will never buy anything from cvs pharmacy for the very simply fact is that they do not give a refund even if you have the receipt and they will give you a store credit. Sorry, I am from the old school if one has the receipt and it is returned in a timely fashion and it was, like the next day I am entitled to a refund to my credit card or debit card. So they dont make money from me there and I spread the word to all to let them know of the situation with cvs. Dont buy cards or candy or anything from them till they change their policy. And speaking about the store credit, they wanted my id and I said no. You did not ask when I bought it so I am not going to show you now. You can see my debit card if you like but that is all. No racial profiling for me but I live in oxon hill maryland and I can see why they would ask for my drivers license, I am not the norm in this area at all if you know what I mean. Just look around and you will see what I mean. So folks dont bother to shop cvs unless you are wanting a store credit and a runaround.


Jason

East Providence,
Rhode Island,
U.S.A.
Profit Margins, Not Sales

#8UPDATE Employee

Sun, December 03, 2006

The point the Pharmacist above is making is the low profit margins of the RX end, this doesn't mean that RX sales arnt high (like 65 to 70% of CVS sales) but for each sale the profit is small compared to a Dept like Photo which takes in 95 cents of every dollar thats sold as profit, even though its no match for the RX in raw sales.


Donald

Oklahoma City,
Oklahoma,
U.S.A.
An average convenience store does more in daily sales without fuel than a CVS store front does

#9UPDATE Employee

Tue, September 12, 2006

I am a store front manger for CVS Pharmacy, I can tell you first hand that the sales are from the Pharmacy in this company, when a typical store does sales of only $1500.00 to 1800.00 per day on store front sales, and that's a average among stores, of course on some days you might have a rare $3,000.00-$4,000.00 day, but lets be honest now, who goes into a CVS to shop for store front items, no one why would they when they can get the same items down the street for 30-50% cheaper. It's an added bonus to get people to come and get the scripts filled. The store fronts are nothing more than to catch small extra sales. A typical C-Store ?convince store? without fuel sales added in daily will run that amount if not more.


Jay

Albany,
New York,
U.S.A.
It dosen't add up because of your insurance....

#10UPDATE EX-employee responds

Fri, January 31, 2003

I am a pharmacist that has worked at most of the major chain drug stores(currently working at a hospital pharmacy therefore I have no reason to defend CVS or any one else) The answer to your question about why your copay and the insurance reimbersment did't add up to the cash cost? Well is not because of CVS. Your insurance company dictates to CVS how much It will pay for a months supply of your drug. In this case your insurance company says we'll only pay 44.02 and the patient will pay 29.02. CVS says "that dosen't even cover the cost of the drug." To which your insurance company replies, "OH Well, that's the cost of doing business with us." The insurance co. rips you and the pharmacy off in this case. It's been a few years since been with CVS, but if I remember correctly the company charges cash customers CVS's cost of the drug plus 20% and 7 dollars, The 7 dollars is just to cover the cost of the prescription vial, labels and time it took to fill. So for CVS just to have those 30 pills on the shelf was around $80.00 and they charged the cash customer 26 dollars. IF you used the insurance plan they lost about 7 dollars. You have to remember retail pharmacies don't make money on their prescription drug sales...the pharmacy loses money often! It's the front end of the store (cards, gifts, vitamins etc.) that keeps them in business.


Jay

Albany,
New York,
U.S.A.
It dosen't add up because of your insurance....

#11UPDATE EX-employee responds

Fri, January 31, 2003

I am a pharmacist that has worked at most of the major chain drug stores(currently working at a hospital pharmacy therefore I have no reason to defend CVS or any one else) The answer to your question about why your copay and the insurance reimbersment did't add up to the cash cost? Well is not because of CVS. Your insurance company dictates to CVS how much It will pay for a months supply of your drug. In this case your insurance company says we'll only pay 44.02 and the patient will pay 29.02. CVS says "that dosen't even cover the cost of the drug." To which your insurance company replies, "OH Well, that's the cost of doing business with us." The insurance co. rips you and the pharmacy off in this case. It's been a few years since been with CVS, but if I remember correctly the company charges cash customers CVS's cost of the drug plus 20% and 7 dollars, The 7 dollars is just to cover the cost of the prescription vial, labels and time it took to fill. So for CVS just to have those 30 pills on the shelf was around $80.00 and they charged the cash customer 26 dollars. IF you used the insurance plan they lost about 7 dollars. You have to remember retail pharmacies don't make money on their prescription drug sales...the pharmacy loses money often! It's the front end of the store (cards, gifts, vitamins etc.) that keeps them in business.


Jay

Albany,
New York,
U.S.A.
It dosen't add up because of your insurance....

#12UPDATE EX-employee responds

Fri, January 31, 2003

I am a pharmacist that has worked at most of the major chain drug stores(currently working at a hospital pharmacy therefore I have no reason to defend CVS or any one else) The answer to your question about why your copay and the insurance reimbersment did't add up to the cash cost? Well is not because of CVS. Your insurance company dictates to CVS how much It will pay for a months supply of your drug. In this case your insurance company says we'll only pay 44.02 and the patient will pay 29.02. CVS says "that dosen't even cover the cost of the drug." To which your insurance company replies, "OH Well, that's the cost of doing business with us." The insurance co. rips you and the pharmacy off in this case. It's been a few years since been with CVS, but if I remember correctly the company charges cash customers CVS's cost of the drug plus 20% and 7 dollars, The 7 dollars is just to cover the cost of the prescription vial, labels and time it took to fill. So for CVS just to have those 30 pills on the shelf was around $80.00 and they charged the cash customer 26 dollars. IF you used the insurance plan they lost about 7 dollars. You have to remember retail pharmacies don't make money on their prescription drug sales...the pharmacy loses money often! It's the front end of the store (cards, gifts, vitamins etc.) that keeps them in business.


Jay

Albany,
New York,
U.S.A.
It dosen't add up because of your insurance....

#13UPDATE EX-employee responds

Fri, January 31, 2003

I am a pharmacist that has worked at most of the major chain drug stores(currently working at a hospital pharmacy therefore I have no reason to defend CVS or any one else) The answer to your question about why your copay and the insurance reimbersment did't add up to the cash cost? Well is not because of CVS. Your insurance company dictates to CVS how much It will pay for a months supply of your drug. In this case your insurance company says we'll only pay 44.02 and the patient will pay 29.02. CVS says "that dosen't even cover the cost of the drug." To which your insurance company replies, "OH Well, that's the cost of doing business with us." The insurance co. rips you and the pharmacy off in this case. It's been a few years since been with CVS, but if I remember correctly the company charges cash customers CVS's cost of the drug plus 20% and 7 dollars, The 7 dollars is just to cover the cost of the prescription vial, labels and time it took to fill. So for CVS just to have those 30 pills on the shelf was around $80.00 and they charged the cash customer 26 dollars. IF you used the insurance plan they lost about 7 dollars. You have to remember retail pharmacies don't make money on their prescription drug sales...the pharmacy loses money often! It's the front end of the store (cards, gifts, vitamins etc.) that keeps them in business.

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